Happy Coffee – Happy Me

Finally, something that has helped me to get back on track. This Happy Coffee has made me very happy the last couple of months. I was already drinking coffee daily, so why not make it a “smart” coffee with some added benefits?? Benefits like Nootropics.

Capture

Nootropics? Never heard of them? So I had to do some light research to figure out what makes this coffee “smart” and why it makes me “happy.”

Natural nootropics are proven in boosting the brain function while at the same time making the brain healthier. Nootropics act as a vasodilator against the small arteries and veins in the brain. Introduction of natural nootropics in the system will increase the blood circulation to the brain and at the same time provide the important nutrient and increase energy and oxygen flow to the brain.

Suliman, Noor Azuin et al. “Establishing Natural Nootropics: Recent Molecular Enhancement Influenced by Natural Nootropic.” Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM vol. 2016 (2016): 4391375. doi:10.1155/2016/4391375

I still don’t fully understand what the product does, scientifically speaking, but I am enjoying it.

Many people claim to lose weight when adding this coffee to their routine. I wouldn’t go as far as to call it a weight loss product, but I certainly feel great and I don’t feel like snacking, which in turn has helped me to lose close to 8 pounds in about six weeks.

I’ve become such a fan of the product that I’ve signed up an Independent Entrepreneur so that I can get my products at a discount.

coffee

http://www.elevacity.com/socal

Currently I’m alternating between the Chocolate and the Coffee, loving them both equally. The company has recently added new products, like a zero-calorie lemonade. I’ve ordered it and can’t wait to try it.

ACE Fitness: What Should a Personal Trainer Look Like?

Article by Dr. Erin Nitschke
on

The “standard” image of a health and exercise professional is constantly evolving, much like the fitness industry itself, and concerns regarding body image abound. This is due, at least in part, to the fact that building a better, more efficient and higher-performing body is part of the business of fitness. On the other hand, fitness isn’t just about the physical body—at least it shouldn’t be.

While the fitness industry has never been immune to body-image issues, the topic has more recently gained greater attention. In a recent issue of the IDEA Fitness Journal, fitness expert Amanda Vogel argued that “body image issues in the fitness industry are nothing new. But the need for a more positive philosophy and more diverse perceptions of beauty is especially relevant right now. With rising competition from fitness technologies, social media stars who plug fitness, TV trainers and an increasingly crowded marketplace within our own communities, a nice body can (and should) only get you so far in this industry” (Vogel, 2018).

Which brings us to the heavily debated question: “What should a personal trainer look like?” Other intriguing questions are offshoots of this debate, including:

  • What makes a personal trainer successful?
  • What makes a personal trainer qualified and valuable?
  • Is the way a personal trainer looks directly related to client success?
  • Is it a realistic and fair expectation that all health and exercise professionals have a perfect physique?
  • What does perfect even mean?

Judging by past definitions and images of “perfection,” no one really knows. So, why should we care?

Fitness experts will agree: A perfect body isn’t necessary to be a professional in the health and fitness industry or to be successful in the industry. This opinion, however, is counterintuitive to the images portrayed in industry advertisements, social media and marketing materials. Images of the stereotypical chiseled, six-pack abs on scantily clad bodies dominate the visual aids to which we and our clients are exposed.

Consequently, it is more the rule —rather than the exception—for a client to make assertions such as “I want to have a six-pack” or “I want to get a perfect body by next summer.” It’s also not unusual for health and exercise professionals to place the same pressure on themselves to “look” the part. What’s interesting is that the majority of health and exercise professionals do not make health and fitness about an outward appearance. Instead, their focus is on helping someone build a better lifestyle.

So, why should we, as the professionals, place pressure on ourselves to obtain and maintain a so-called perfect body when no one knows what that means?

In her article, Vogel argued that the change has to begin with us (2018). Chris Gagliardi, an ACE Certified Professional agrees. “The perfect body is the one you are confident in. We cannot equate physical appearance with knowledge, competence or professional effectiveness. It’s time we, as both an industry and individual professionals, acknowledge that healthy looks different for and on everybody.”

How can we help our clients develop body confidence and body pride if we ourselves are incapable of doing the same?

Perhaps the best question to ask isn’t what a personal trainer should look like, but what a personal trainer should be like. Being a personal trainer is not about fitting into some cookie-cutter, air-brushed, photo-shopped image. It’s about character, integrity, passion and knowledge. Further, success as a personal trainer is not dependent upon the presence or absence of some idealized physical attributes that most people are unlikely to possess. We need to recognize that our thoughts and words have tremendous power. We also must start placing the focus on what really matters—the individual and the contributions he or she makes to the fitness industry. The sum total of a health and exercise professional’s contribution will not be his or her body. If that’s how we see it, we are, quite sadly, adrift in our mission.

If you’ve ever attended a professional fitness industry conference or workshop, the images you see in advertisements do not accurately portray the professionals in the industry. Fitness professionals look different from each other and that’s O.K. That’s authentic. That’s real. We are role models. We are leaders. We are influencers. Let that be the mark we leave and be judged upon—not a size or number on the scale.

What should a personal trainer look like? Like you. Like me. Like each of us in our individual and imperfect glory. That’s what we look like.

https://www.acefitness.org/…/what-should-a-personal-trainer-look-like

Putting It Out There

For about a year the bathroom scale has been fluctuating between the same 3-5 pounds. Up down, up down. Believe me, there have been no complaints from me about that. It’s all part of weight maintenance. That’s my main goal … just maintain and keep the weight off this time!

However, over the last couple of months, that fluctuation has only gone up … with no “back down.” It’s not a lot, but it is still concerning to me and it’s the reason for this post. I’m hoping that by putting it out there in the universe will somehow give me the strength to reel it back in and get back in control.

I started a new job this year and these people have no idea where I’ve come from or my journey to get here. Food is everywhere, I often find myself over indulging because I know these new co-workers are not judging me or questioning my choices.

I know I have to take ownership of my own decisions, but I still find it sad that I can’t just have a couple of Hershey Kisses or a small cookie without seeing evidence of it on the scale. I guess the most disappointing part is that I cannot say NO to these small goodies or really any food that is offered to me.

The only strategy that has worked for me is to completely avoid any temptation. I don’t buy any junk food or goodies for home. Each morning I pack myself a great lunch including healthy snacks for the day, all with the calorie count in mind while also keeping in mind what I will have for dinner that night. Everything is counted for ahead of time, right down to the exact calorie. The problem starts when someone says “there are cookies in the breakroom” or “who wants something from Starbucks?” or “go with me to the cafeteria to see what they got.”

At one time, not so long ago, I was able to say no most of the time, but lately I can never say no. I think it may be time for me to let these new co-workers in on my recent weight loss. Not because they are my problem but because it may help keep me accountable and more comfortable declining goodies that are offered.

Proving and Improving Myself

Last year proved to be an extremely productive year for me. I started the year 70 pounds down from my original start weight and I begun my first full year of weight loss maintenance. But there was still more to achieve in 2018.

At the age of 48, I completed my studies at community college and received my Associates Degree in Accounting. Although, I playecapd it off to family and friends, claiming that it wasn’t a big deal, it definitely was. I am very proud to add a college degree to my recent accomplishments.

Over the summer I received my certification as a Personal Trainer. That course was certainly no easy task, but I really wanted to legitimize my weight loss and my continued fitness journey to myself. I want to share everything I’ve learned with everyone I come in contact with. I want to shout it from the roof tops …. I’VE LOST 70 POUNDS AND I’M A CERTIFIED PERSONAL TRAINER! LET ME HELP YOU!

But, what I’m learning along the way is, not everyone cares. Some people are not ready to make a lifestyle change. I know for most people they just don’t know how or where to begin. That is where I want to help. If I’m being truthful, approaching people in a helpful and tactful way and being sensitive to people’s feelings is not my forte. I come across as bossy or talking down to people or sometimes bragging about my own success. This is the #1 area I need to work on. I want my loved ones to know I love them and I just want to help. I guess it’s best to wait until someone asks for help, rather than trying to force unwanted information on them.

Twelve 5Ks in 12-months!

Not bad for someone who started 2017 over 60 pounds heavier and could hardly walk without getting winded. I’m not saying I ran all 12 of the 5Ks this year, not even close, it was only the last two that I did more running than walking.

IMG_1296

My goal for 2018 is to run an entire 5K (with no walking), and then maybe just maybe, attempt a 10K. I doubt I’ll ever go for any longer distances, but it is a great workout and it’s nice to get out of the gym once in a while and get some fresh air.

I have quite a nice collection of T-shirts and medals from 2017, some are super cute 🙂

Changing Plans

Well I did it, I survived my summer vacation. It is amazing how fast 4 weeks goes when you are on vacation. There was no big trip this year, so all the fun was kept local. I was worried about staying on my plan while being at home most of time and outside of my normal routine. I’m so proud of myself, I did great. If fact, I lost an additional 5 pounds while I was off work.

Not only did I on stay on plan, I also had some time to reflect. Although I love Weight Watchers and would recommend their program to anyone starting out on their weight loss journey, I began to think that perhaps I’ve outgrown Weight Watchers. Their Smart Points program is simple, fun and there is lots of support within the online Connect community, but I think I’m ready for more. I want to be more aware of what I’m actually eating, as in protein, fat, carbs, sugar, etc.

Last week I began transitioning from Weight Watchers to My Fitness Pal. The food tracker is very similar to WW, except that you get the details of how many calories you are eating and how many grams of Generation yprotein, carbs, fat and sugar. The mobile app is user friendly and My FitBit workouts are transferred to My Fitness Pal which creates a calorie adjustment.  It’s only been about a week, but so far I like this program, and it’s FREE 🙂

When Something “clicks”

Everyone has had the moment, that moment when something just “clicks” and you know it’s time. Time for what? Well that’s different for everyone. Maybe it’s the moment you realize it’s time to find a new job or end a bad relationship or go back to school or lose weight.

The moment for me began this past Thanksgiving 2016 when my sister-in-law posted a very unflattering picture of me on Facebook and tagged me! I was horrified. And sad. Had I really gotten that fat? Then, in early December, I needed to attend an evening event and not one pair of long pants fit me. I had to purchase a size 16, I cried. I hated those pants and the tag inside that read 16. By the time my birthday came around in later December, something finally clicked in my brain and I decided, “starting right now, I’m done with this crap!” Who’s in control of my life anyway? Me. I took responsibility on December 18, 2016 and now I take care of me and my body first, before everything else.

The timing couldn’t have been worse, it was just before Christmas, but I didn’t care. Taking control of my life and my health were more important to me than cheddar potatoes, or glazed ham, or the endless spread of Christmas cookies and treats. Come to find out it really wasn’t that hard to get through the holiday events, because something was different in my head this time. I didn’t want to put an excess of bad stuff in this body that I was trying to change. (Well, I did eat one tamale that my goddaughter made for her first time, and it was worth it.)

Even after about 6 months, I really don’t find it difficult to stay on track. I’m continuing to use the Weight Watchers method of counting points and really can eat whatever I want (if I have the points for it), but on most days I don’t want anything unhealthy. I’m trying to teach myself a new healthier way of eating and living, I’m not trying to quickly fix a weight problem, that part is coming along on its own naturally.

When that moment comes for you, and you will know when it does, listen to it.

IMG_0617
I can’t believe I’m posting this. Thanksgiving 2016